Child Trust Fund: Young people are given the first opportunity to access money

Millions of people over the age of 18 can now withdraw money from child trust funds for the first time.
Children born in September 2002 were given coupons by the government to invest in the future and the money was not available until they were 18 years old.

Savings can now be in excess of £ 1,000 or more when parents add contributions.
However, thousands of young people cannot expect this savings to be in their name.
What is Child Trust Fund?
The Labor Government has established a child trust fund to encourage parents to save for their children.
The idea is to save children at 18 to support expenses such as paying for additional education or starting their own lives for the first time.
The government initially deposits £ 250 into the tax-free account for the child’s first year and adds an additional £ 250 when the child is seven years old.
For low-income families the pay is £ 500.
Parents, family and friends can also contribute to the account until they set limits.
The system was watered down by the coalition government in January 2011 and then abolished altogether.
What is happening right now?

The first recipient of the child trust fund voucher will be 18 years old and have access to money for the first time.
According to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC), around 55,000 people turn 18 every month, and eventually around 6.3 million people in total can either make money or keep saving.
Children can control their accounts from the age of 16, but they can only withdraw money from the age of 18.
For those who do nothing, the child trust fund provider will either transfer it to an individual savings account, which is also tax free, or transfer it to another account with similar benefits.

Carrie McWolter turns 18 in two weeks with access to a £ 1,400 child trust fund.
She will start a pharmacy course in Edinburgh and says she will use the money for future living and vacation expenses and save part of it.
He learned of possible funding by searching on social media and using the tracking service from The Share Foundation.
“When I found out, I was quite surprised. I didn’t know I had it. My mother forgot,” he said.
He then told a close friend who discovered that he had similar savings that he didn’t know about.
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How much does it cost?
This money is often deposited in an account where it is invested in stocks. The success of these stocks over time determines their value as well as the initial value of government vouchers.
Accountants estimate that with maximum parental contributions over the years and a growing investment, the fund could cost up to £ 70,000.
A more realistic scenario for many people is that the money in the account remains untouched for years. Even then, those born to low-income families were likely to receive around £ 1,500 in unexpected ways.
Where’s the money?
Parents are invited to open a child trust fund with one of the many providers within one year of their child’s birth. About 4.5 million were created by parents or guardians.
The children being cared for have accounts created by local authorities and are now managed by the Share Foundation, a charity that also helps people track their funds.
In the 1.8 million cases where the parents did not act, the account was automatically created by the UK Tax Service.
HMRC admits that in thousands of possible cases young people do not know they have such huge savings.
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Tracking service
Children’s trust funds can be found through the Government Gateway service, which requires login or registration. A child trust fund reference number or a unique social security number is also required.
The Share Foundation Foundation offers free on-demand services.
For more information on child trust funds, please contact the State Monetary and Pension Service.
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Treasury Secretary John Glenn said: “We want to make sure that all young people have access to the money that’s been made available to them, invest in their future and maintain that habit when they turn 18.
“If you are not sure whether you have an account or where it is located, it is easy to track your provider online.”
When it comes to access, there are many options youths need to consider.
“Having a case like this can be scary,” said Adrian Lowcock, director of private investment at finance firm Willis Owen.
“There are many options to consider when using money. Some may want to spend, others may want to invest to make more money for their future.”

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